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Managing The GRUB Bootloader With QGRUBEditor On Ubuntu 7.10


QGRUBEditor is a graphical frontend for managing the GRUB bootloader. By using QGRUBEditor, you do not have to mess around with the GRUB configuration in /boot/grub/menu.lst anymore. This article shows how to install and use QGRUBEditor on Ubuntu 7.10.

I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!

 

1 Installing QGRUBEditor

Go to http://www.qt-apps.org/content/show.php/QGRUBEditor?content=60391 and click on the Ubuntu download link (starting with Ubuntu 8.04 there’s a qgrubeditor package in the Ubuntu repositories that you can install using Synaptic, but prior to Ubuntu 8.04 you should use the approach described here):

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In the Firefox download dialogue, select Open with gdebi-gtk (default):

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The QGRUBEditor package is being downloaded:

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After the download has finished, the Package Installer starts. Click on the Install Package button:

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Type in your password:

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Next the dependencies for QGRUBEditor are being downloaded…

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… and installed:

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Afterwards QGRUBEditor is being installed:

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Click on Close after the installation and leave the Package Installer:

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That’s it! QGRUBEditor is now installed and ready to be used.

 

2 Using QGRUBEditor

To start QGRUBEditor, go to Applications > System Tools > QGRUBEditor:

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When QGRUBEditor starts, it makes a backup of the current /boot/grub/menu.lst named /boot/grub/menu.lst_original (from which we can restore the original GRUB configuration) and tells us about it:

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This is how QGRUBEditor looks. On the GRUB Entries tab, we see a list of all currently configured kernels. You can change their order by using the arrow buttons. It is important to note that all your changes are written to /boot/grub/menu.lst immediately – without pressing a Save button!

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On the GRUB Settings tab, we can modify the global GRUB settings (like setting the default kernel to boot, setting a splash image, etc.):

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You can modify a kernel stanza by going to the GRUB Entries tab again and double-click a kernel. You will get to a form with the values of the selected kernel; make your changes and click on OK:

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Below the menu bar, you can find some interesting buttons:

The View Input button opens the Input window…

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… which shows details about your hard drive and the partitions on the Device Input tab…

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… and the contents of /boot/grub/menu.lst on the Menu Input tab:

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The Add Entry button allows you to add a new kernel stanza:

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If you click on it, the following form opens where you can fill in the details of your new kernel stanza:

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The Edit Entry button allows you to modify an existing kernel stanza (as shown before):

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The Copy Entry button lets you duplicate an existing kernel stanza (which you can then use as a template, for example):

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The Remove Entry button removes the selected kernel stanza from the GRUB configuration:

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The Scan File button reloads the current /boot/grub/menu.lst file:

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The Encrypt Password button lets you set a password for the bootloader – this makes sense if you don’t want anyone else to boot your computer:

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The Create GRUB Splash Image button lets you set a different splash image:

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With the Backup File button, you can back up the current /boot/grub/menu.lst

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… and with the Restore File button, you can restore /boot/grub/menu.lst from a previous backup:

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The Delete Backup button lets you delete a backup:

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When you click on the Settings button…

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… you can configure the QGRUBEditor settings (not the GRUB settings!):

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When you click on the What’s This? button, you can afterwards click on any other item in the QGRUBEditor interface, and an explanation will pop up for that item:

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The About QGRUBEditor button brings up some detailed information about the QGRUBEditor program:

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  • QGRUBEditor: http://www.qt-apps.org/content/show.php/QGRUBEditor?content=60391
  • Ubuntu: http://www.ubuntu.com

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