Cheap VPS & Xen Server


Residential Proxy Network - Hourly & Monthly Packages

The Perfect Desktop – Part 1: Fedora Core 6


With the release of Microsoft’s new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial is the first of a series of articles where I will show people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Fedora Core 6 in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e. that has all software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.

I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!

 

1 Preliminary Note

To fully replace a Windows desktop, I want the Fedora Core 6 desktop to have the following software installed:

Graphics:

  • The GIMP – free software replacement for Adobe Photoshop
  • F-Spot – full-featured personal photo management application for the GNOME desktop
  • Google Picasa – application for organizing and editing digital photos

Internet:

  • Firefox
  • Opera
  • Flash Player 9
  • gFTP – multithreaded FTP client
  • Thunderbird – email and news client
  • Evolution – combines e-mail, calendar, address book, and task list management functions
  • aMule – P2P file sharing application
  • Bittorrent client
  • Azureus – Java Bittorrent client
  • Gaim – multi-platform instant messaging client
  • Skype
  • Google Earth
  • Xchat IRC – IRC client

Office:

  • OpenOffice Writer – replacement for Microsoft Word
  • OpenOffice Calc – replacement for Microsoft Excel
  • Adobe Reader
  • GnuCash – double-entry book-keeping personal finance system, similar to Quicken
  • Scribus – open source desktop publishing (DTP) application

Sound & Video:

  • Amarok – audio player
  • Audacity – free, open source, cross platform digital audio editor
  • Banshee – audio player, can encode/decode various formats and synchronize music with Apple iPods
  • MPlayer – media player (video/audio), supports WMA
  • Rhythmbox Music Player – audio player, similar to Apple’s iTunes, with support for iPods
  • gtkPod – software similar to Apple’s iTunes, supports iPod, iPod nano, iPod shuffle, iPod photo, and iPod mini
  • XMMS – audio player similar to Winamp
  • dvd::rip – full featured DVD copy program
  • Kino – free digital video editor
  • Sound Juicer CD Extractor – CD ripping tool, supports various audio codecs
  • VLC Media Player – media player (video/audio)
  • Real Player
  • Totem – media player (video/audio)
  • Xine – media player, supports various formats; can play DVDs
  • GnomeBaker – CD/DVD burning program
  • K3B – CD/DVD burning program
  • Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:

  • Nvu– WYSIWYG HTML editor, similar to Macromedia Dreamweaver, but not as feature-rich (yet)
  • Bluefish – text editor, suitable for many programming and markup languages
  • Quanta Plus – web development environment, including a WYSIWYG editor

Other:

  • VMware Server – lets you run your old Windows desktop as a virtual machine under your Linux desktop, so you don’t have to entirely abandon Windows
  • TrueType fonts
  • Java

Fedora Core 6 lets you choose between multiple desktop environments (GNOME, KDE, XFCE). I’ve decided to install GNOME in this article.

I will use the username falko in this tutorial, and I will download all necessary files to falko‘s desktop which is equivalent to the directory /home/falko/Desktop. If you use another username (which you most probably do ;-)), please replace falko with your own username. So when I use a command like

cd /home/falko/Desktop

you must replace falko.

 

2 Installing The Base System

Download the five Fedora Core 6 iso images from http://fedora.redhat.com/Download/, burn them onto CDs, and boot your computer from the first CD. At the boot prompt, hit <ENTER>:

1

You can let the installer check your Fedora CDs, but if you’re short on time select Skip as the tests can take some minutes:

2

Hit Next:

3

Select your language:

4

Select your keyboard layout:

5

Select Yes when asked Would you like to initialize this drive, erasing ALL DATA?:

6

The default partitioning is ok, so you can hit Next:

7

Confirm your selection by answering Yes to Are you sure you want to do this?:

8

The default networking settings (DHCP) are ok, so click on Next:

9

Select your time zone:

10

Specify a root password:

11

Now we select the software that we want to install. Select Office and Productivity only. Don’t enable additional repositories as we will do this later (in my tests the installer crashed three times when I selected Fedora Extras; a fourth time it was ok). Then check Customize now and click on Next:

12

Now we can select the package groups we want to install. Select

  • GNOME Desktop Environment
  • Authoring and Publishing
  • Editors
  • Educational Software
  • Engineering and Scientific
  • Games and Entertainment
  • Graphical Internet
  • Graphics
  • Office/Productivity
  • Sound and Video
  • Text-based Internet
  • Development Libraries
  • Development Tools
  • Administration Tools
  • Base
  • Dial-up Networking Support
  • Java
  • System Tools
  • X Window System

and uncheck all other groups, then click on Next:

13

The installer checks and resolves all dependencies:

14

Click on Next to start the installation to your hard disk:

15

Click on Next to start the installation to your hard disk:

16

Your hard disk is being formatted:

17

Afterwards, Fedora is installed. This can take a few minutes:

18

Some post-installation steps (such as installing the GRUB boot loader) are performed:

19

Afterwards, remove the Fedora CD from the CD drive and click on Reboot to reboot and finish the installation:

20

This is how it looks when your new Fedora system boots:

21

After the first boot, we have to specify some details for the initial configuration of our new system. Click on Forward:

22

Accept the license agreement and click on Forward:

23

The default firewall settings are ok, so you can leave them unchanged and click on Forward:

24

SELinux is a security extension of Fedora that should provide extended security. In my opinion you don’t need it to configure a secure system, and it usually causes more problems than advantages (think of it after you have done a week of trouble-shooting because some service wasn’t working as expected, and then you find out that everything was ok, only SELinux was causing the problem). Therefore I disable it:

25

Confirm the SELinux deactivation:

26

Set your date and time, then click on the Network Time Protocol tab:

27

With the network time protocol (NTP) your computer can fetch the current time from a time server over the internet, so you don’t have to adjust the system clock every few weeks. The default settings should work, so to enable NTP click on Forward:

28

Now we create a normal user account. This is the user we use to log in to our desktop:

29

Next test your sound card. Click on the Play button (the triangle):

30

If you hear a sound, click on Yes:

31

Then click on Finish:

32

The system must reboot for the changes to take effect:

33

Now the base system is ready to be used.

3 Update The System

After the new reboot, log in with your username and password:

34

35

36

This is how your new Fedora Core 6 desktop looks like:

37

Most probably after a few moments a pop up will come up saying Security Updates Available. Of course, we want to update our system, so we click on Apply Updates:

38

For the update we need superuser privileges, so we must type in the root password:

39

Afterwards, the package updater starts and retrieves update information:

40

Then it shows us all packages that are available for update. Typically we will select all packages and click on Apply updates:

41

The updater resolves all dependencies (additional packages that need to be installed). Of course we accept these dependencies by clicking on Continue:

42

Afterwards the updater downloads all packages. Depending on how many packages have to be updated and their size this can take some time:

43

It is possible that the updater asks you to import keys of packages. These keys are used to verify the integrity of the downloaded packages. Sometimes there are keys that the system doesn’t know yet. As we are only using Fedora package repositories for the downloads until now, we assume that the unknown keys are ok and click on Import key:

44

After the download of the packages has finished, the Package updater installs the downloaded packages (and therefore updates the old packages):

45

The updater will tell you when a reboot is needed (for example, if the kernel has been updated). Click on Reboot now to perform the reboot:

46

4 Change The Screen Resolution (Optional)

It is possible that your Fedora desktop uses a lower screen resolution than would be possible. Normally you can adjust the screen resolution under System > Preferences > Screen Resolution, but it’s possible that you don’t find your desired screen resolution there, although you know that your hardware supports it (this happened to me when I prepared this tutorial in a VMware virtual machine: my desktop had a resolution of 800×600 pixels and wouldn’t let me choose a higher one, although I knew this was possible).

If this happens, go to System > Administration > Display:

46a

Type in the root password:

46b

Then go to the Hardware tab and click on the Configure… button right to Monitor Type:

46c

Select your monitor model (if you’re in a VMware virtual machine, the model doesn’t seem to matter – just choose one):

46d

Then open a terminal window under Applications > Accessories > Terminal:

47

Type in

su

and specify the root password. Then run

gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf

to edit the /etc/X11/xorg.conf file in a text editor. A text editor will open with that file. Search for the “Screen” section and go to the Modes line. There you add your desired screen resolution (e.g. “1024×768”) and click on Save. Afterwards you can close the text editor.

48

Afterwards we must log out of our current session for the changes to take effect, so we go to System > Log Out…:

49

Then log in again, and you should find that your desktop now has your desired screen resolution:

50

51

You should find the following situation ([x] marks an application that is already installed, where [ ] is an application that is missing). Some applications (such as Java) won’t show up in the menus, but we know that we installed them during the initial installation of the Fedora system:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[ ] F-Spot
[ ] Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[ ] Opera
[ ] Flash Player
[ ] gFTP
[ ] Thunderbird
[x] Evolution
[ ] aMule
[ ] Bittorrent
[ ] Azureus
[x] Gaim
[ ] Skype
[ ] Google Earth
[ ] Xchat IRC

Office:
[x] OpenOffice Writer
[x] OpenOffice Calc
[ ] Adobe Reader
[ ] GnuCash
[ ] Scribus

Sound & Video:
[ ] Amarok
[ ] Audacity
[ ] Banshee
[ ] MPlayer
[x] Rhythmbox Music Player
[ ] gtkPod
[ ] XMMS
[ ] dvd::rip
[ ] Kino
[x] Sound Juicer CD Extractor
[ ] VLC Media Player
[ ] Real Player
[x] Totem
[ ] Xine
[ ] GnomeBaker
[ ] K3B
[ ] Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:
[ ] Nvu
[ ] Bluefish
[ ] Quanta Plus

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[ ] TrueType fonts
[x] Java

So some applications are already on the system…

 

6 Adding Software Repositories

The official Fedora repositories don’t provide all the software we need. Fortunately there are also third-party repositories for Fedora Core 6 (mostly maintained by volunteers) that have what we need, and we can make our system use these repositories.

To do this, open a terminal window again (under Applications > Accessories > Terminal) and type in

su

to become root.

Then run

rpm -ivh http://ftp.freshrpms.net/pub/freshrpms/fedora/linux/6/freshrpms-release/freshrpms-release-1.1-1.fc.noarch.rpm

This adds the FreshRPMs repository to our package manager.

There are four other repositories that we add manually by creating the appropriate files in our gedit text editor. Still as root, run

gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/macromedia.repo

and put the following into that file and save it:

[macromedia]
name=Macromedia for i386 Linux
baseurl=http://macromedia.rediris.es/rpm/
#baseurl=http://macromedia.mplug.org/rpm/
#baseurl=http://sluglug.ucsc.edu/macromedia/rpm/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=http://macromedia.rediris.es/FEDORA-GPG-KEY

Do the same with the three other repositories (still as root):

gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/dries.repo

[dries]
name=Extra Fedora rpms dries - $releasever - $basearch
baseurl=http://ftp.belnet.be/packages/dries.ulyssis.org/fedora/linux/$releasever/$basearch/dries/RPMS/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=1

gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/newrpms.repo

[newrpms.sunsite.dk]
name=Fedora Core 5 i386 NewRPMS.sunsite.dk
baseurl=http://newrpms.sunsite.dk/apt/redhat/en/$basearch/fc$releasever
http://newrpms.atrpms.net/apt/redhat/en/$basearch/fc$releasever
failovermethod=priority
enabled=0
gpgcheck=1

gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/atrpms.repo

[atrpms]
name=ATrpms - Stable
baseurl=http://dl.atrpms.net/fc$releasever-$basearch/atrpms/stable
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY.atrpms
enabled=0

[atrpms-testing]
name=ATrpms - Testing
baseurl=http://dl.atrpms.net/fc$releasever-$basearch/atrpms/testing
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY.atrpms
enabled=0

# Warning: Don't enable this "bleeding" repo if you want stable software!
[atrpms-bleeding]
name=ATrpms - Bleeding
baseurl=http://dl.atrpms.net/fc$releasever-$basearch/atrpms/bleeding
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY.atrpms
enabled=0

Then import the software keys of the new repositories (still as root):

rpm –import http://freshrpms.net/packages/RPM-GPG-KEY.txt
rpm –import http://apt.sw.be/dries/RPM-GPG-KEY.dries.txt
rpm –import http://newrpms.sunsite.dk/gpg-pubkey-newrpms.txt
rpm –import http://atrpms.net/RPM-GPG-KEY.atrpms

7 Installing Additional Software

Now that we have added additional repositories, a lot more packages are available in our package manager for installation, especially a big deal of our needed packages. To install them, go to Applications > Add/Remove Software:

52

Type in the root password:

53

The Package Manager opens. Go to the List tab. Select the following packages for installation (* is a wildcard; e.g. mplayer* means all packages that start with mplayer) and click on Apply afterwards:

  • amarok
  • amarok-visualisation
  • amule
  • audacity
  • azureus
  • banshee
  • bittorrent
  • bittorrent-gui
  • bluefish
  • dvdrip
  • f-spot
  • ffmpeg
  • flash-plugin
  • gftp
  • gnomebaker
  • gnucash
  • gstreamer-plugins*
  • gtkpod
  • k3b
  • k3b-extras
  • kdewebdev
  • kino
  • lame
  • mjpegtools
  • mplayer*
  • ntfs-3g
  • scribus
  • thunderbird
  • vlc
  • xchat
  • xchat-gnome
  • xine
  • xine-lib
  • xine-skins
  • xinetd (needed by VMware Server)
  • xmms*

54

Click on Continue:

55

The Package Manager resolves the dependencies of the chosen packages:

56

Click on Continue again:

57

The chosen packages and their dependencies are downloaded:

58

It is possible that there are other unknown keys. Accept them by clicking on Import key:

59

The chosen packages are installed:

60

Click on OK to finish the software installation:

61

8 Inventory (II)

Now let’s check again what we have so far by browsing the menus again:

62

Our inventory should now look like this:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] F-Spot
[ ] Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[ ] Opera
[x] Flash Player
[x] gFTP
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Evolution
[x] aMule
[x] Bittorrent
[x] Azureus
[x] Gaim
[ ] Skype
[ ] Google Earth
[x] Xchat IRC

Office:
[x] OpenOffice Writer
[x] OpenOffice Calc
[ ] Adobe Reader
[x] GnuCash
[x] Scribus

Sound & Video:
[x] Amarok
[x] Audacity
[x] Banshee
[x] MPlayer
[x] Rhythmbox Music Player
[x] gtkPod
[x] XMMS
[x] dvd::rip
[x] Kino
[x] Sound Juicer CD Extractor
[x] VLC Media Player
[ ] Real Player
[x] Totem
[x] Xine
[x] GnomeBaker
[x] K3B
[ ] Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:
[ ] Nvu
[x] Bluefish
[x] Quanta Plus

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[ ] TrueType fonts
[x] Java

One of the packages we’ve just installed is the Flash Player 9 for Linux. To see if it works in our Firefox browser, open Firefox and type in

about:plugins

in the address bar. In the page that loads you should see that Flash is listed:

63

You can now open a web site of which you know that it uses Flash. For example, www.spiegel.de has video news in Flash. You should be able to see (and hear) the Flash movies:

64

Another web site that uses Flash movies is YouTube, for example.

A few applications are still missing, so let’s install them now.

9 TrueType Fonts

To install TrueType fonts, open a terminal window again and become root:

su

Then run

wget -c http://easylinux.info/uploads/msttcorefonts-1.3-4.noarch.rpm
rpm -ivh msttcorefonts-1.3-4.noarch.rpm
rm -f msttcorefonts-1.3-4.noarch.rpm
/etc/init.d/xfs restart

10 RealPlayer

To install RealPlayer, visit http://www.real.com/linux/ in Firefox and download the RPM package (don’t hit the big yellow Download RealPlayer button, but use the small link Download RPM Package below it instead):

65

Save it to your hard disk, e.g. to your desktop (that’s Firefox’ default setting):

66

67

Then open a terminal window and become root:

su

Go to the directory where you saved the RealPlayer RPM package. If you saved it on the desktop, that would be /home/<your_username>/Desktop, e.g. /home/falko/Desktop in my case:

cd /home/falko/Desktop

Then install the RealPlayer like this:

yum -y install compat-libstdc++-33
rpm -ivh RealPlayer10GOLD.rpm
rm -f RealPlayer10GOLD.rpm

Afterwards you will find a RealPlayer icon in the Applications > Sound & Video menu:

68

11 Adobe Reader

To download Adobe Reader, go to http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2_allversions.html and select the following:

Operating system: Unix/Linux
Version: Linux (.rpm)
Your language

Then click on Continue:

69

Then click on the Download Adobe Reader button and save the file on your hard disk (e.g. your desktop):

70

71

Open a terminal and become root:

su

Go to the directory where you saved the file, e.g.

cd /home/falko/Desktop

Adobe Reader depends on the package compat-libstdc++-33 which we already installed when we installed RealPlayer. If you didn’t install RealPlayer, then install compat-libstdc++-33 now:

yum -y install compat-libstdc++-33

(Of course you can do this even if you installed RealPlayer before. yum (that’s Fedora’s package manager) will just tell you that the package is already installed.)

Then install Adobe Reader:

rpm -ivh AdobeReader_enu-7.0.9-1.i386.rpm
rm -f AdobeReader_enu-7.0.9-1.i386.rpm

Afterwards, you will find Adobe Reader in Applications > Office (I ended up with two Adobe Reader icons, I’m not sure why, but it doesn’t hurt, so I don’t change it):

72

12 Multimedia Codecs

To install multimedia codecs, open a terminal and become root:

su

Then run

yum –enablerepo=atrpms install w32codec

13 Skype

To download Skype, go to http://www.skype.com/download/skype/linux/, choose Static binary tar.bz2 with Qt compiled in, and save the file on your hard disk (e.g. your desktop):

73

74

Then open a terminal, become root:

su

and install Skype like this:

cd /home/falko/Desktop
tar jxvf skype_staticQT-1.3.0.53-generic.tar.bz2 -C /opt/
ln -s /opt/skype-1.3.0.53/skype /usr/bin/skype
cp /opt/skype-1.3.0.53/skype.desktop /usr/share/applications/skype.desktop
cp /opt/skype-1.3.0.53/icons/skype_32_32.png /usr/share/pixmaps/skype.png
rm -f skype_staticQT-1.3.0.53-generic.tar.bz2

Afterwards you will find Skype under Applications > Internet:

75

14 Opera

Go to http://www.opera.com/download/ in your browser and select Fedora as distribution, then Fedora Core 5, Core 6. Click on the Download Opera button and save the file to your hard disk (e.g. your desktop, /home/falko/Desktop in my case):

76

77

Open a terminal, become root:

su

and install Opera like this:

cd /home/falko/Desktop
rpm -ivh opera-9.10-20061214.6-shared-qt.i386-en.rpm
rm -f opera-9.10-20061214.6-shared-qt.i386-en.rpm

Afterwards you will find Opera under Applications > Internet:

78

15 Google Earth

To install Google Earth, open a terminal and become root:

su

Then run

cd /home/falko/Desktop
wget http://dl.google.com/earth/GE4/GoogleEarthLinux.bin
sh GoogleEarthLinux.bin

This will download Google Earth and start the installation. Before the installation starts, you must accept the license agreement, so click on I Agree:

79

Accept all default settings and click on Begin Install:

80

81

After the installation, you can click on Quit or on Start, if you want to start Google Earth now:

82

To create a Google Earth icon in our desktop menu, run

cp /opt/google-earth/googleearth.desktop /usr/share/applications/
rm -f GoogleEarthLinux.bin

Google Earth can be found under Applications > Internet:

83

16 Google Picasa

To install Google Picasa, open a terminal and become root:

su

Then run

cd /home/falko/Desktop
wget http://dl.google.com/linux/rpm/stable/i386/picasa-2.2.2820-5.i386.rpm
rpm -ivh picasa-2.2.2820-5.i386.rpm
rm -f picasa-2.2.2820-5.i386.rpm

Afterwards you can find Picasa under Applications > Graphics:

84

17 Nvu

Open a terminal and become root:

su

Nvu depends on xorg-x11-deprecated-libs which is a package that is not available for Fedora Core 6, so we use that package from the CentOS Linux distribution (which is related to Fedora). We download that package from one of the CentOS mirrors:

cd /home/falko/Desktop
wget ftp://ftp.nluug.nl/pub/os/Linux/distr/CentOS/4.4/updates/i386/RPMS/xorg-x11-deprecated-libs-6.8.2-1.EL.13.37.5.i386.rpm
rpm -ivh xorg-x11-deprecated-libs-6.8.2-1.EL.13.37.5.i386.rpm

Nvu also depends on libXp which is available for Fedora Core 6, so we can installl it like this:

yum -y install libXp

Then we download and install Nvu:

wget -c http://www.nvu.com/download/linux/1.0/nvu-1.0-RedHat_and_Fedora/nvu-1.0-1.rhel4.fs.i386.rpm
rpm -ivh nvu-1.0-1.rhel4.fs.i386.rpm

If you get an error message like this:

[root@localhost Desktop]# rpm -ivh nvu-1.0-1.rhel4.fs.i386.rpm
error: Failed dependencies:
xorg-x11-deprecated-libs is needed by nvu-1.0-1.rhel4.fs.i386

install xorg-x11-deprecated-libs again:

rpm -ivh xorg-x11-deprecated-libs-6.8.2-1.EL.13.37.5.i386.rpm

and then Nvu again:

rpm -ivh nvu-1.0-1.rhel4.fs.i386.rpm

Afterwards delete both RPM packages:

rm -f xorg-x11-deprecated-libs-6.8.2-1.EL.13.37.5.i386.rpm
rm -f nvu-1.0-1.rhel4.fs.i386.rpm

Nvu can now be found under Applications > Programming:

85

18 Inventory (III)

This is what we have now:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] F-Spot
[x] Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Opera
[x] Flash Player
[x] gFTP
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Evolution
[x] aMule
[x] Bittorrent
[x] Azureus
[x] Gaim
[x] Skype
[x] Google Earth
[x] Xchat IRC

Office:
[x] OpenOffice Writer
[x] OpenOffice Calc
[x] Adobe Reader
[x] GnuCash
[x] Scribus

Sound & Video:
[x] Amarok
[x] Audacity
[x] Banshee
[x] MPlayer
[x] Rhythmbox Music Player
[x] gtkPod
[x] XMMS
[x] dvd::rip
[x] Kino
[x] Sound Juicer CD Extractor
[x] VLC Media Player
[x] Real Player
[x] Totem
[x] Xine
[x] GnomeBaker
[x] K3B
[x] Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:
[x] Nvu
[x] Bluefish
[x] Quanta Plus

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[x] TrueType fonts
[x] Java

So everything is installed except for VMware Server…

19 VMware Server

With VMware Server you can let your old Windows desktop (that you previously converted into a VMware virtual machine with VMware Converter, as described in this tutorial: http://www. kreationnext.com/vmware_converter_windows_linux) run under your Fedora desktop. This can be useful if you depend on some applications that exist for Windows only, or if you want to switch to Linux slowly.

To download VMware Server, go to http://www.vmware.com/download/server/ and click on Download Now:

86

Accept the license agreement by clicking on Yes:

87

Then download the VMware Server for Linux .tar.gz file (not the rpm file!), e.g. to /home/falko/Desktop:

88

Then open a terminal and become root:

su

Then do this:

cd /home/falko/Desktop
tar xvfz VMware-server-*.tar.gz

It is possible that you get this error when you run the VMware installer later on:

make[1]: Entering directory `/usr/src/kernels/2.6.19-1.2911.fc6-i686′
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config1/vmnet-only/driver.o
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config1/vmnet-only/hub.o
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config1/vmnet-only/userif.o
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config1/vmnet-only/netif.o
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config1/vmnet-only/bridge.o
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config1/vmnet-only/procfs.o
/tmp/vmware-config1/vmnet-only/procfs.c:33:26: error: linux/config.h: No such file or directory

To avoid that, we simply create that config.h file now:

touch /usr/src/kernels/`uname -r`-i686/include/linux/config.h

Before we run the VMware installer, we should check our kernel version now by running:

uname -r

For me, the output looks like this:

[root@localhost Desktop]# uname -r
2.6.19-1.2911.fc6

Now we start the VMware installer:

cd vmware-server-distrib
./vmware-install.pl

The installer will ask you a lot of questions. You can always accept the default values simply by hitting <ENTER>. If you don’t get any errors, go to chapter 19.1 Finishing The VMware Server Installation.

If your kernel is 2.6.19, you will most likely get an error like this:

Using 2.6.x kernel build system.
make: Entering directory `/tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only’
make -C /lib/modules/2.6.19-1.2911.fc6/build/include/.. SUBDIRS=$PWD SRCROOT=$PWD/. modules
make[1]: Entering directory `/usr/src/kernels/2.6.19-1.2911.fc6-i686′
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only/driver.o
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only/hub.o
CC [M]  /tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only/userif.o
/tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only/userif.c: In function ‘VNetCopyDatagramToUser’:
/tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only/userif.c:629: error: ‘CHECKSUM_HW’ undeclared (first use in this function)
/tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only/userif.c:629: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
/tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only/userif.c:629: error: for each function it appears in.)
make[2]: *** [/tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only/userif.o] Error 1
make[1]: *** [_module_/tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only] Error 2
make[1]: Leaving directory `/usr/src/kernels/2.6.19-1.2911.fc6-i686′
make: *** [vmnet.ko] Error 2
make: Leaving directory `/tmp/vmware-config0/vmnet-only’
Unable to build the vmnet module.

For more information on how to troubleshoot module-related problems, please
visit our Web site at “http://www.vmware.com/download/modules/modules.html” and
“http://www.vmware.com/support/reference/linux/prebuilt_modules_linux.html”.

Execution aborted.

In kernel 2.6.19, CHECKSUM_HW has been replaced by CHECKSUM_PARTIAL. So if you get that error, do this:

cd /usr/lib/vmware/modules/source/
tar -xvvf vmnet.tar
cd vmnet-only/
gedit bridge.c

In the text editor that comes up replace CHECKSUM_HW with CHECKSUM_PARTIAL, then save the file:

89

Do the same for the file userif.c:

gedit userif.c

Then run

cd ..
tar -cvvf vmnet.tar vmnet-only/
/usr/bin/vmware-config.pl

This will take you through the VMware configuration again. Again, accept all default values.

If you get this error:

This program previously created the file /dev/vmmon, and was about to remove
it. Somebody else apparently did it already.

mknod: `/dev/vmmon’: File exists
Unable to create the character device /dev/vmmon with major number 10 and minor
number 165.

Execution aborted.

simply run

/usr/bin/vmware-config.pl

again. This time the error will be gone, and the VMware Server installation should finally succeed.

 

19.1 Finishing The VMware Server Installation

At the end of the installation, you will be asked to enter a serial number:

Please enter your 20-character serial number.

Type XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX or ‘Enter’ to cancel:

Go to http://www.vmware.com/download/server/ again and click on the Register button:

86

Fill in your personal details. Afterwards you will get a page with serial numbers for VMware Server. Copy one of them and paste it into the terminal where you were asked for the serial number.

90

After the successful installation, you can delete the VMware Server download file and the installation directory:

cd /home/falko/Desktop
rm -fr vmware-server-distrib
rm -f VMware-server-*.tar.gz

You will now find VMware Server under Applications > System Tools:

91

When you start it, select Local host:

92

Afterwards, you can create virtual machines (or import your virtual Windows machine that you created with VMware Converter):

93

 

20 Inventory (IV)

We have now all wanted applications installed:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] F-Spot
[x] Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Opera
[x] Flash Player
[x] gFTP
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Evolution
[x] aMule
[x] Bittorrent
[x] Azureus
[x] Gaim
[x] Skype
[x] Google Earth
[x] Xchat IRC

Office:
[x] OpenOffice Writer
[x] OpenOffice Calc
[x] Adobe Reader
[x] GnuCash
[x] Scribus

Sound & Video:
[x] Amarok
[x] Audacity
[x] Banshee
[x] MPlayer
[x] Rhythmbox Music Player
[x] gtkPod
[x] XMMS
[x] dvd::rip
[x] Kino
[x] Sound Juicer CD Extractor
[x] VLC Media Player
[x] Real Player
[x] Totem
[x] Xine
[x] GnomeBaker
[x] K3B
[x] Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:
[x] Nvu
[x] Bluefish
[x] Quanta Plus

Other:
[x] VMware Server
[x] TrueType fonts
[x] Java

 

  • Fedora: http://fedora.redhat.com

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

comments