Cheap VPS & Xen Server


Residential Proxy Network - Hourly & Monthly Packages

The Perfect Desktop – Slackware 12


This tutorial shows how you can set up a Slackware 12 GNU/Linux desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktop (please note the current version is Slackware 14.1 released on November 07, 2013).

Unlike some other Linux distributions, Slackware users find themselves at the command line quite often. One Slacker who maintained an online guide wrote the “pros and cons of Slackware could be summarized in one word: minimalism.” He went on to discuss the duality of minimalism by noting that although “Minimalism certainly means stability” it also means that Slackware “can be exasperating for some people because the end-user must configure many features with manual editing rather than the more familiar point-and-click.”

You may be asking yourself if Slackware is the right distribution for you. When it comes to Linux you have a huge selection of distributions to choose from. Some like Zenwalk Linux and VectorLinux are based on Slackware but provide a more user friendly point-and-click environment for the new Linux user.

Kreationnext

has a series of “Perfect Desktop” tutorials including one for a nice distribution named PCLinuxOS. Read that tutorial here. There’s also a website that tries to match people with a Linux distribution suitable for them at Linux Distribution Chooser.

To follow this tutorial you should be familiar with navigating the file system with a file manager. And, willing to type commands at the prompt. If you’re not already familiar with using the command line please click here to read a simple introduction to it.

Before you begin please join the Slackware mailing lists. The mailing lists will keep you updated on new versions, major updates, software updates, and announcements relating to security issues.

When installing an Operating System it’s sometimes necessary to know what hardware is installed on the PC. Before beginning this tutorial spend a few minutes and get the name of the hardware installed on your system including the network card, sound card, video card, monitor, and the monitor’s horizontal scan range (HorizSync) and vertical scan range (VertRefresh). If you’re running Windows you may want to audit your systems hardware with Belarc Advisor or the Device Manger. If you’re running Linux you may want to use HardInfo.

Please note that I won’t be going through every software installation step by step. For more information please refer to section 6, Installing Additional Software.

This tutorial comes with no guarantees that it will work for you. These are simply the steps I take to setup Slackware 12 on my desktop computer.

Please backup ALL of your personal data before starting.

1 Preliminary Note

To fully replace a Windows desktop, I would like the Slackware 12 desktop to have the following software installed:

Graphics:

  • The GIMP – free software replacement for Adobe Photoshop
  • Google Picasa – application for organizing and editing digital photos

Internet:

  • Firefox
  • Thunderbird
  • Java Runtime Environment (JRE) – includes the Java Plug-in which enables applets to run in popular browsers
  • Flash
  • RealPlayer
  • aKregator – RSS Reader
  • Pidgin – multi-platform instant messaging client (formerly known as Gaim)
  • Xchat IRC – IRC Client
  • gFTP – multithreaded FTP client
  • BitTorrent – command line client that integrates with Firefox
  • Guarddog – firewall
  • Google Earth
  • Skype – a P2P Voice Over IP program

Office:

  • OpenOffice.org – replacement for Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, and Microsoft Access
  • Adobe Acrobat reader
  • Kontact – personal information management (PIM)
  • Scribus– open source desktop publishing (DTP) application
  • kmymoney2 – personal finance manager

Sound & Video:

  • Audacious – Winamp style audio player
  • K3B– CD/DVD burning program
  • Noatun– out of the box plays mpg, mpeg, avi, wmv, asf, and mp3 on your new Slackware 12 system
  • VLC Media Player– plays DVD,flash, mov, and other various audio and video formats

Programming:

  • Quanta Plus – web development environment, including a WYSIWYG editor
  • Kate – an editor for text (includes Spell Check) and programming
  • The Java 2 SDK – a development environment for building applications, applets, and components

System Utilities:

  • htop – a command line, interactive process viewer friendlier than top
  • iptraf – a command line tool, Interactive Colorful IP LAN Monitor
  • netstat – a command line tool, print network connections, routing tables, interface statistics, masquerade connections, and multicast memberships
  • Filelight– a KDE graphical disk-space analyzer
  • KDE Info Center – a central place to find information about your computer system
  • Konqueror – file manager, web browser, picture viewer, rip Audio CDs, read archive files such as zip, tar, gz, SSH, SFTP

Other:

  • VMware Server – lets you run another OS as a virtual machine under your Linux desktop
  • NTFS-3G driver – Read/Write support for NTFS partitions.
  • FUSE

Slackware 12 lets you choose between multiple desktop environments (KDE, Xfce, Fluxbox, Blackbox, Window Maker, fvwm2 Fvwm, twm). For this tutorial we will use KDE.

I will use the username brian in this tutorial, and I will download all necessary files to various directories on brian’s desktop which is equivalent to the directory /home/brian/Desktop. If you use another username (which you most probably do ;-)), please replace brian with your own username. So when I use a command like

cd /home/brian/Desktop

you must replace brian.

 

2 Installing The Base System

Download Slackware 12 and burn it onto a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM.

For this tutorial I downloaded the Slackware 12.0 DVD ISO (everything).

Use the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM you created and boot your computer from it. From here on I will use the term DVD to refer to both the CD-ROM and DVD-ROM.

At the boot prompt press Enter:

a

If you’re using a US keyboard press Enter. If not type 1 and press Enter:

b

Select your keyboard map using the UP and DOWN arrow keys.

The OK and Cancel buttons can be selected with the LEFT and RIGHT arrow keys.

Highlight a keyboard map. Select OK and press Enter:

c

Test your new keyboard layout.

If it works, enter 1 on a line by itself and press Enter:

e

Welcome to the Slackware Linux installation disk:

f

During setup root does not have a password. Type root and press Enter:

gablank

Once you login you will be at the Linux command line:

g1

Before setup begins the hard disk needs to be partitioned. For simplicity’s sake I will create two partitions. One big partition that will be our root partition. The root partition is also known as /. We will also create a 512 megabyte swap partition. Of course, the partitioning scheme is completely up to you – if you like, you can create more than just one big partition. For example, you might want a swap partition, a root partition and a home partition. By partitioning like that you can reinstall the OS without losing your home directory.

Just so you know I’m writing this tutorial on more than one computer so some screenshots may show IDE and others may show SATA. At the moment I am installing on an IBM compatible PC. I have an IDE hard disk and will create a partion on /dev/hda. IDE drives are given names /dev/hda to /dev/hdd. For example, if you have one IDE drive attached to the first IDE controller then it will be named /dev/hda. If you have a second IDE drive on the same drive controller it will be named /dev/hdb. If you have a third drive it will be attached to the second controller and be named /dev/hdc. As you can guess the fourth drive on the second controller is /dev/hdd 🙂

After the drive is partitioned it will have a number appended to its name. For example, the second partition on the first drive will be /dev/hda2.

SATA and SCSI drives follow a similar pattern but are represented by sd instead of hd. The second partition of the first SATA drive is named /dev/sda2.

You can partition your disk with either fdisk or cfdisk. For this tutorial I used fdisk.

If you have an IDE drive type

fdisk /dev/hda

and press Enter:

If you have a SATA drive type

fdisk /dev/sda

and press Enter:

Type m to see what commands are available:

mforhelp

To see your current partion table type p

i

As you can see there are no partitions on my IDE hard disk:

J

Warning: IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU BACK UP ANY INFORMATION YOU WANT TO SAVE BEFORE DESTROYING THE PARTITION IT LIVES ON.

Create the swap partition. Type n and press Enter:

k

Type p to create a primary partition and press Enter:

m

Type 1 to create partition number 1 on /dev/hda and press Enter:

n

The default is fine so press Enter:

oa

Type +512M and press Enter:

q

To make this partion a swap partion type t and press Enter:

r

Type L or l (usually case is important in Linux…but not in this case) to see the available codes:

r

The code for Linux swap is 82:

Codes

Type 82 and press Enter:

t

The setup program indicates it’s a swap partion:

v

To create the root partition type n and press Enter:

k

Type p to create another primary partition:

m

Type 2 to create partition number two:

x

Press Enter to accept the default value for the First cylinder.

Then, press Enter again to accept the Last cylinders default value:

za

Type p and press Enter to view the newly created partition table. You can see that the swap partition is named /dev/hda1 and the root partition is named /dev/hda2:

zf.notbootable

Make the root (/dev/hda2) partition bootable by typing a and pressing Enter.

Then type 2 to select the root partition and press Enter:

zd

To confirm that partion 2 is now bootable type p and press Enter.

The * indicates that /dev/hda2 is a bootable partition:

zeconfirmbootable

To save the changes type w and fdisk exits:

ze

At the root prompt type setup and press Enter:

zg

Select ‘ADDSWAP’ and press Enter:

zi

Options with a [*] are turned on and off with the SPACEBAR.

Press Enter to setup up the swap partition:

zj

Select No to check for bad blocks.

zk

After the swap space has been configured press Enter:

zl

Press Enter to set up the root partition:

zm

Press Enter to do a Quick format:

zn

Press Enter to select ext3:

zo

Press Enter when done:

zp

If you have any FAT or NTFS partitions the setup routine will give you the opportunity to add those partitions to /etc/fstab. You can add them now or later.

If you don’t have any FAT or NTFS partitions you will not see the two screenshots below:

NTFS

NTFS1

Press Enter to install from your DVD:

zq

Press Enter to scan for your media:

zr

Accept the defaults shown below. If you want to add International language support for KDE use the DOWN arrow key and press the SPACEBAR to select KDEI.

Press Enter:

zs

Accept the default for a full installation and press Enter:

zt

The software installation begins:

zt

Creating a USB boot stick has never worked on my PC. You can try though. I select Skip and then press Enter:

zu

Select a modem and press Enter:

zv

zw

Press Enter unless you need to append extra parameters to the kernel. I’ve never had to add extra parameters:

zy

Press Enter to install LILO to the Master Boot Record.

zz

Select your mouse and press Enter:

zza

Select Yes and press Enter:

zzb

You can reconfigure your network at anytime by running the netconfig program at the command line.

The following describes how to set up your computer to use DHCP. You may have a different network configuration. To setup your network now press Enter.

zzc

Enter a hostname (it can be anything you want) and press Enter:

zzd

Type a domain name and press Enter:

zze

I use a DHCP server and select it and press Enter:

zzf

Press Enter or add a DHCP hostname if necessary:

zzg

https://www.

Kreationnext

.com/images/the_perfect_desktop_slackware12/zzh.png

zzh

Press Enter:

zzi

I selected No and pressed Enter:

zzj

Select the correct setting for your hardware clock and press Enter:

zzk

Select your Timezone and press Enter:

zzl

For this tutorial we’re using KDE. You can always select a another window manager after the tutorial with the command, xwmconfig.

Select KDE and press Enter.

zzm

All new Linux passwords are confirmed by typing them twice.

Press Enter to set a root password:

a.paw

Press Enter to complete setup:

zzr

Using the DOWN arrow select EXIT and press Enter:

zzs

Reboot your computer:

zzt

After rebooting press Enter at the boot prompt:

zzu

At the login prompt type root and press Enter. Then type the password you created for the root account and press Enter:

a.loginRoot

3 Post Installation Configuration

In this section we will create your user account for every day computing. Then we’ll enable basic security, setup audio, create the locate database, start X, and personalize KDE.

adduser:

Generally people don’t run root as their main account. So we’re going to create a new user for everyday use. When you need root access you will be able to use the su command. It’s risky using the root account as your daily account because it’s very easy to run a command and accidentally break your system.

In the terminal we create your new user account by running

adduser

Enter a login name for your new user and press Enter:

a.loginnamefornewuser

Accept the default for User ID and press Enter:

a.loginnamefornewuser.B

Accept the default for Initial group and press Enter:

a.loginnamefornewuser.C

Important! Do not accept the default value for Additional groups.

Add the following group names to Additional groups:

cdrom, audio, video, plugdev, scanner

Additional groups will now look like the screenshot below. Press Enter to continue:

a.loginnamefornewuser.D

Accept the default Home directory by pressing Enter:

a.loginnamefornewuser.E

Accept the default Shell and press Enter:

a.loginnamefornewuser.F

Press Enter for Expiry date:

a.loginnamefornewuser.G

If all the information below is correct press Enter:

a.loginnamefornewuserZ

Slackware creates the new account:

a.slackwareCreatesAccount

Additional information can be added or press Enter to accept the defaults:

a.userInfo

Create a password for your new user. Again, you will need to enter it twice. That completes the Account setup:

changePW

To confirm your new account is working correctly logout as root and login with your new username and password. In Slackware 12 notice how the prompt changes from # to $ signifying we’re not logged in as root anymore.

loginOut

Basic Security Configuration:

Type su at the command line and press Enter:

su

Type the password for root and press Enter:

postInstall

It is beyond the scope of this tutorial and my knowledge to talk about security in depth. Please refer to other sources for more information such as LinuxSecurity.com, the CERT Coordination Center, and look at nmap since it’s already installed on your system. With that in mind I include the steps below that I take to secure my PC. I use a hardware firewall with NAT and I setup tcpwrappers. I don’t use a software firewall but later you will have the opportunity to install a software firewall named Guarddog. You may be interested in doing a free Internet security checkup at ShieldsUP! after setting up your security.

Change your directory to the /etc directory.

cd /etc

If you haven’t used tab completion before it’s good to know because it speeds up your typing. Hit the Tab key after entering a few letters of a file name or command and tab completion will automatically fill in the rest.

Before working with a configuration file I always create a backup. To create a backup use the copy command named cp.

The three files that we are going to edit are located in /etc. They are hosts.deny, hosts.allow and inetd.conf.

Make a copy of hosts.allow and press Enter.

cp hosts.allow hosts.allow.BAK

Make a copy of hosts.deny and press Enter.

cp hosts.deny hosts.deny.BAK

Make a copy of inetd.conf and press Enter.

cp inetd.conf inetd.conf.BAK

Now that we have backups of those files we’re ready to edit them. I usually use the vi editor and many of the screenshots are taken while using vi. Pico is less esoteric and may be easier for you to use.

The hosts.deny file shown below is how it should look after you edit it. Edit hosts.deny by adding the text ALL : ALL and then save the file and exit.

To use pico to edit the hosts.deny file simply type

pico hosts.deny

# hosts.deny    This file describes the names of the hosts which are
#               *not* allowed to use the local INET services, as decided
#               by the '/usr/sbin/tcpd' server.
#
# Version:      @(#)/etc/hosts.deny     1.00    05/28/93
#
# Author:       Fred 
ALL : ALL
# End of hosts.deny.

By adding ALL : ALL you deny access to everyone. We will poke holes in hosts.deny by editing hosts.allow next.

To use pico to edit the hosts.allow file simply type,

pico hosts.allow

The edited hosts.allow is shown below:

#
# hosts.allow   This file describes the names of the hosts which are
#               allowed to use the local INET services, as decided by
#               the '/usr/sbin/tcpd' server.
#
# Version:      @(#)/etc/hosts.allow    1.00    05/28/93
#
# Author:       
#
#
ALL : 127.0.0.1
ALL : 192.168.1.
# End of hosts.allow.

By adding the line ALL : 127.0.0.1 we are allowing this machine (a.k.a. localhost) access to the services on this machine.

By adding the line ALL : 192.168.1. we allow access from all machines in our LAN.

The dot following 192.168.1. isn’t a typo. It represents the numbers 0-254.

The # is a comment and means to ignore all text that follows on the same line.

Lastly, we will edit inetd.conf and place a # in front of everything except auth:

Type

pico inetd.conf

Place a # in front of time, time and comsat:

tcpwrappers3

tcpwrappers4

tcpwrappers5

Audio Configuration:

alsaconf is a simple shell script which tries to detect the sound cards on your system and then writes a suitable configuration file for ALSA.

Type,

alsaconf

and press Enter:

userInfo1

ALSA searches for your sound cards:

alsa7

If you’re not sure which card to choose refer back to your hardware notes.

Select your card and press Enter:

alsa8

Select Yes and press Enter:

alsa9

Press Enter:

userInfo2

After the sound driver is configured the program exits:

userInfo3

Now use alsamixer to configure the levels.

Type

alsamixer

and press Enter:

a.alsa.mixer

Configure your settings with the LEFT, RIGHT, UP, and DOWN arrow keys. Press the escape key when finished:

alsamore1

To store your settings type

alsactl store

and press Enter:

a.alsa.storejpg

Your sound card should now be configured for your system. Your sound card can be reconfigured at any time by rerunning the above commands when when logged in as root.

Create the searchable database of the filesystem:

To search for files you can use the following commands; which, whereis, find, and slocate. Before using slocate for the first time we’ll need to create its database named slocate.db.

Change your current directory to /var/lib/slocate.

cd /var/lib/slocate/

If you type ls you’ll see that there is no slocated.db file.

cdslocate

We will create the slocate.db file by typing the following command and pressing Enter:

updatedb

This may take several minutes to run. When the update is complete the program exits and you’re returned to the command prompt. If you type ls again you’ll see that slocate.db was created:

altslocate

Start X:

Slackware 12 uses the X Window System from X.Org. X provides the graphical user interface for Linux. X can be difficult to configure and troubleshooting X is beyond the scope of this tutorial. If you have a problem starting X please visit http://www.slackware.com/config/x.php for configuration assistance. As long as you have a VESA compatible graphics card then X should start. If you have an ATI or NVIDIA graphics card please see the vendor specific documentation so that you may use their drivers.

Don’t Start X as root. If you’re at the root prompt type exit and press Enter:

logoutRoot

Type startx and press Enter:

astartx

[*Author’s Note Start. Added April 27, 2008…
If X does not start please look at:
– “Slackware Linux Essentials – The Official Guide To Slackware Linux”, created by David Cantrell, Logan Johnson & Chris Lumens. Chapter 6 covers X Configuration. http://slackbook.org/
– “Slackware Linux Basics For Slackware Linux 12.0” by Daniël de Kok. Chapter 16 covers X Configuration. http://www.slackbasics.org/
– Visit http://www.linuxquestions.org/ and click Linux Forums->Linux Distributions->Slackware
…Author’s Note Ends*]

The KDE Personalizer Wizard:

Choose your country and language and click Next:

weakpasswrd2

Click Next:

weakpasswrd3

Set the level of detail and click Next:

weakpasswrd4

Select a theme and click Next:

weakpasswrd5

Click Finish:

weakpasswrd6

Here is your new KDE desktop:

weakpasswrd7

Now the base system is ready to be used.

4 Update The System

Before we download any updates let’s create some directories on our Desktop. This way all of our downloads can be kept in one location.

Right click your Desktop and select Create New->Folder:

createDirA

Name it downloads and click OK:

createDirB

The downloads directory is now available on your Desktop:

createDirB1

Either single click or double click the downloads directory to open it. You can read more about clicking in Section 22.

The screenshot below is of Konqueror browsing the directory named downloads:

createDirB2

 

In the downloads directory make another folder.

Right click and select Create New->Folder:

createDirB3

Name it updates and click OK:

createDirB4

We’re going to keep all Slackware software updates in this location:

createDirB5A

Slackware has a package management system similar to other OS’s. The difference between Slackware package management and other Linux distributions like Ubuntu is in how each OS deals with dependencies. Slackware doesn’t do dependency checking while Ubuntu does.

A few of the programs Slackware provides to manage packages includes pkgtool, installpkg, removepkg and upgradepkg.

The tool that we’re going to use when updating packages from the Security Advisories is upgradepkg.

To update Slackware we can check two places; email and the Slackware Security Advisories website. Both provide the same information. Earlier in this tutorial you signed up for the Slackware mailing lists. Slackware 12 has been out since July 2007 so you’ve missed earlier advisories sent out via email. Because of this we’re going to check the Slackware Security Advisories website so we can catch up on the ones we missed.

Go to http://www.slackware.com/. Click Security Advisories and then 2007:

updatetpcf

Below are the security advisories. Together we’re going to update tcpdump. Click the advisory for tcpdump:

updatetpcf1

The tcpdump advisory contains important information about the update such as:

Available download locations 
The MD5 signature is f2b34a0c29485d8f942602b69fae0c70
Upgrade the package as root  upgradepkg tcpdump-3.9.7-i486-1_slack12.0.tgz

Leave the tcpdump security advisory page open so we can check the MD5 signature after we download the update.

There are a few ways to download updates. We can use ftp, wget, Konqueror or Firefox. In this example we will use Firefox.

[*Author’s Note Start. Feb 15 2008… If you don’t want to download updates one at a time then you may use wget to download all the updates at once.  Select a local mirror from http://www.slackware.com/getslack/.
1.Open a terminal and “su” to root.

2.To download only the updates run the following command substituting my pseudo path with the path for your local mirror. Remember, Slackware updates are kept in the following directory, /patches/packages/ on all mirrors.

#wget ftp://localmirrors/pathToSlack12/slackware/slackware-12.0/patches/packages/*.tgz

3. Now that all the updates have been downloaded you can upgrade all your packages at once with the following command:
# upgradepkg *.tgz

4. You’re finished.  Just make a note of the packages you’ve updated.  That way you won’t have to unnecessarily update the same package again. Author’s Note Ends*]

 

Go to http://www.slackware.com/getslack/ and select the mirror closest to you.

The folder named Slackware-current is for testing and development and we won’t be going in there. All of our downloads will be from the latest stable release of Slackware 12 in the folder:

versionStable

Click the slackware-12.0 folder. All Slackware updates are kept in the following directory, /patches/packages/

Click the patches folder:

versionIndex.current.patch

And then click packages:

versionIndex.current.packages

All security updates are displayed:

updateSlack12tcpdump

By default Firefox downloads all files to the your Desktop. Let’s change that so we can save the file where we want. From the Firefox main menu click Edit and then select Preferences. In the window that opens select the tab named Main. In the section named Downloads click the radio button for Always ask me where to save files.

Now we’re ready to save the file. Click the file named tcpdump-3.9.7-i486-1_slack12.0.tgz to start the download:

emailSecD

Click Save file:

updateTcpdumpA

Save it to /brian/Desktop/downloads/updates

updateTcpdumpA1

After it’s downloaded view the file using Konqueror:

updateTcpdumpA5

We need to open a terminal to install the update. You can open a terminal in Konqueror by pressing F4. You can also right click the white space of the directory containing tcpdump-3.9.7-i486-1_slack12.0.tgz and click Actions->Open Terminal Here:

updateTcpdumpA6

Another way to open a terminal is to click K Menu->System->Terminal Emulator:

kmenu

Once the terminal opens you can change to the directory you saved tcpdump-3.9.7-i486-1_slack12.0.tgz in by typing,

cd /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/updates/

(replace brian with your own username!).

Before installing the file we’re going to check its MD5 signature. Please verify MD5 signatures even if I don’t mention it during the rest of the tutorial.

At the command line type,

md5sum tcpdump-3.9.7-i486-1_slack12.0.tgz

That provides the MD5 signature. Use your mouse to highlight the signature:

md5

Then click Edit->Copy:

updateTcpdumpA11

In the browser window that still has the tpcdump Security Advisory open type Ctrl+F. In the find window that opens type Ctrl+V to paste the signature into the find field. As long as the signature matches the one in the web page you can continue. If it doesn’t match it means you should not use the file. In that case try to download it again.

Below you can see that the signatures match:

md7

In the command line window type,

su

to become root

To install type:

upgradepkg tcpdump-3.9.7-i486-1_slack12.0.tgz

updateTcpdumpA9

The output below indicates the package was upgraded:

md8

That’s how you keep Slackware up to date. Follow the above procedure and update all remaining packages before proceeding.

 

5 Inventory Of What We Have So Far

Now let’s browse all menus to see which of our needed applications are already installed. You should find the following situation ([x] marks an application that is already installed, where [ ] is an application that is missing):

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[ ] Google Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Java Runtime Environment
[ ] Flash
[ ] RealPlayer
[x] aKregator
[x] Pidgin
[x] Xchat IRC
[x] gFTP
[ ] BitTorrent
[ ] Guarddog
[ ] Google Earth
[ ] Skype

Office:
[ ] OpenOffice.org
[ ] Adobe Acrobat reader
[x] Kontact
[ ] Scribus
[ ] kmymoney2

Sound & Video:
[x] Audacious
[x] K3B
[x] Noatun
[ ] VLC Media Player

Programming:
[x] Quanta Plus
[x] Kate
[ ] The Java 2 SDK

System Utilities:
[ ] htop
[x] iptraf
[x] netstat
[ ] Filelight
[x] KDE Info Center
[x] Konqueror

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[ ] NTFS-3G driver
[ ] FUSE

So some applications are already on the system.

6 Installing Additional Software

During the remainder of this tutorial we will be installing and removing software using installpkg, pkgtool, SlackBuild scripts, binary executables and from source. You can install some, all or none of the software packages with the following exception; ntfs-3g is dependant on FUSE. So, if you want read/write support for NTFS partitions you need to install FUSE first.

As I mentioned at the beginning of the tutorial, if an installation routine follows the same steps from a previous installation I will refer you to those instructions.

We’re going to be installing in the following order:

Plugins for Firefox:
– Installation of Flash will be step by step.
– Installation of RealPlayer will be step by step.

From the /extra directory located on your DVD:
– The installation of BitTorrent will be step by step.
– You can refer to the BitTorrent installation to install the Java 2 SDK.

Using pkgtool:
-Remove KOffice to be replaced with OpenOffice.org

From SlackBuild scripts located at SlackBuilds.org:
– The installation of FUSE will be step by step.
– The installation of NTFS-3G will be step by step.
– The installation of OpenOffice.org will be step by step.
– You can refer to any of the above installation routines to install Guarddog.
– You can refer to any of the above installation routines to install Adobe Acrobat reader.
– You can refer to any of the above installation routines to install Scribus.
– You can refer to any of the above installation routines to install kmymoney2.
– You can refer to any of the above installation routines to install htop.
– You can refer to any of the above installation routines to install Skype.

From .bin files:
– The installation of Google Picasa will be step by step.
– The installation of Google Earth will be step by step.

From installpkg:
– Installation of VLC Media Player will be step by step.

From a Perl script that copies files and compiles modules from the running kernel’s sources:
– Installation of VMware Server will be

step by step.

From source:
– Filelight will be step by step.

 

7 Installing Plugins for Firefox

Install Flash

Open Firefox and type about:plugins in the location bar:

firefoxplugs1

The page that opens shows the currently installed plug-ins. Some are shown in the screenshot below:

firefoxplugs

We can see that the Java Plug-in enabling applets to run in popular browsers is already installed with Slackware 12.

Open your browser to http://www.adobe.com/products/flashplayer/ and click Download now:

flash1

Click Download .tar.gz file:

flash2aa

Select Save to Disk and click OK:

flash3

Save the file to your /downloads directory. In the case below I created a directory named /flash and saved the file there. It’s not necessary to create these directories within your /downloads directory. I just happened to do it that way.

Saving all of the remaining files to your /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/ (replace brian with your own username!) directory will be fine.

flash4

Files that end with .tar.gz or .tgz are gzipped files and are equivalent to Microsoft Windows zipped files. Gzipped files are unpacked with the command,

tar xzvf

Bzipped files end in .bz2 or .tbz2. Bzipped files are more highly compressed then gzipped files. If you have a choice to download either a gzipped file or bzipped file download the bzipped file. Bzipped files are like Microsoft Windows zipped files, too. Unpack bzipped files with the command,

tar xjvf

In the terminal window go to the location where you saved the install_flash_player_9_linux.tar.gz file by typing,

cd /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/

To unpack the file type,

tar xzvf install_flash_player_9_linux.tar.gz

A directory named install_flash_player_9_linux was created when you extracted the file above. Type ls to see it:

flash16

Change to the new directory by typing,

cd install_flash_player_9_linux

flash17

Let’s check to see if the file is executable. Type,

ls -l

flahsisexec

The flashplayer-installer is executable. The x means it’s executable. Click here to learn about file permissions.

You don’t need to be root to install Adobe Flash Player 9.

To install run,

./flashplayer-installer

flash6

Press Enter to install Adobe Flash Player 9

flash8

The installer will instruct you to shut down your browser(s). Press Enter to continue:

flash9

Type y to proceed:

flash11

The installation completes:

flash13

Type n to exit:

flash14

After installation the plug-in will be installed in your Mozilla browser.

Start Firefox and type about:plugins in the Location field. You should see that Shockwave Flash is a plugin:

flash15

To test Flash try YouTube. Below is one of my films on youtube:

b7

Install RealPlayer

Click the link http://www.real.com/linux.

Then click, Download RealPlayer

rp2

Click Save File:

rp3

Save to /Desktop/downloads:

realplayerNewInstall

Open a terminal,

realplayerNewInstall8Term

To install RealPlayer the installer, RealPlayer10GOLD.bin, must be executable. To check if the file is executable type

ls -l

realplayerNewInstall2

The file listing shown above indicates it’s not an executable. If it was executable it would show an x instead of -.

To make the file executable type,

chmod a+x RealPlayer10GOLD.bin

Type ls -l to check the file again:

realplayerNewInstall4

The listing above confirms it’s now an executable.

su to root:

sutoroot

To install type,

./RealPlayer10GOLD.bin

realplayerNewInstall5

Press Enter to continue:

realplayerNewInstall6

Type /opt/realplayer as your install path and press Enter:

realplayerNewInstall7

Press Enter to Finish and begin copying files:

realinstallSFF

Press Enter to configure system-wide symbolic links:

rp1A

Press Enter to accept /usr as the prefix for symbolic links:

rp1

Restart Firefox and look at about:plugins to see that it’s being loaded. It should look like this:

realplayerA

To test in your web browser go to film.com and watch a movie trailer:

realplayerIronMan

Or, Metacafe:

realplayer19a

To open the stand alone version of RealPlayer 10 click K Menu->Multimedia->RealPlayer 10 – Media Player

rp15

The first time you run RealPlayer 10 the RealPlayer Setup Assistant will start:

Follow the prompts:

realplayerSetupA

Select your options and click OK:

realplayerSetupB

Click Forward

realplayerSetupC

Read the license agreement and click Quit, Back or Accept:

realplayerSetupD

To test you can visit http://news.bbc.co.uk/. When you click a video to watch you will have the option to watch it in the browser or launch it in the stand alone player. Click Launch in stand alone player:

realinstallSFF2

And it plays:

realplayerNewInstall8a

8 Inventory (II)

Now let’s check again what we have so far by browsing the menus again. Our inventory should now look like this:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[ ] Google Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Java Runtime Environment
[x] Flash
[x] RealPlayer
[x] aKregator
[x] Pidgin
[x] Xchat IRC
[x] gFTP
[ ] BitTorrent
[ ] Guarddog
[ ] Google Earth
[ ] Skype

Office:
[ ] OpenOffice.org
[ ] Adobe Acrobat reader
[x] Kontact
[ ] Scribus
[ ] kmymoney2

Sound & Video:
[x] Audacious
[x] K3B
[x] Noatun
[ ] VLC Media Player

Programming:
[x] Quanta Plus
[x] Kate
[ ] The Java 2 SDK

System Utilities:
[ ] htop
[x] iptraf
[x] netstat
[ ] Filelight
[x] KDE Info Center
[x] Konqueror

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[ ] NTFS-3G driver
[ ] FUSE

9 Installing From The /extra Directory

The /extra directory contains extra/alternate Slackware packages that might be handy. The /extra directory is on your installation media (disk 3 if using the CD set) and also on the Slackware mirrors. Packages from the /extra directory can be installed by root using installpkg.

Together we will install BitTorrent. Afterwards you can follow the same steps to install the Java 2 SDK.

Place your DVD in your drive and the window below will open. Select Open in New Window and click OK:

bitOpenCD

Browse to the directory named extra on the DVD and open the bittorrent directory:

bitInstall.nameofdvd2

From the bittorrent directory click Tools->Open Terminal:

bitInstall.nameofdvd3

At the Terminal su to root:

postInstall

As root type,

installpkg bittorrent-4.4.0-noarch-2.tgz

The installation begins:

bitInstall

And completes:

bitInstall1

BitTorrent is now installed. BitTorrent is located on your system in the /usr/bin directory. You can read Section 22 for a brief introduction on how to use it.

To install the Java 2 SDK simply follow the steps outlined above.

 

10 Inventory (III)

Both BitTorrent and the Java SDK are command line tools and don’t install icons to the K Menu. In the inventory list below I made the assumption that you installed the Java SDK from the previous section and I marked it with an [x]. Our inventory should now look like this:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[ ] Google Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Java Runtime Environment
[x] Flash
[x] RealPlayer
[x] aKregator
[x] Pidgin
[x] Xchat IRC
[x] gFTP
[x] BitTorrent
[ ] Guarddog
[ ] Google Earth
[ ] Skype

Office:
[ ] OpenOffice.org
[ ] Adobe Acrobat reader
[x] Kontact
[ ] Scribus
[ ] kmymoney2

Sound & Video:
[x] Audacious
[x] K3B
[x] Noatun
[ ] VLC Media Player

Programming:
[x] Quanta Plus
[x] Kate
[x] The Java 2 SDK

System Utilities:
[ ] htop
[x] iptraf
[x] netstat
[ ] Filelight
[x] KDE Info Center
[x] Konqueror

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[ ] NTFS-3G driver
[ ] FUSE

 

11 Remove KOffice

KDE comes with its own office suite named KOffice. I’m going to uninstall KOffice before installing OpenOffice.org. You don’t need to remove KOffice. I’d just rather not have two Office Suites on my system.

To see the current menu structure click K Menu->Office

kofficesnapshot2

I’m going to use pkgtool to remove KOffice to use OpenOffice.org. You can also use removepkg if you want.

At the terminal type,

su

and enter root’s password:

sutoroot

Then type,

pkgtool

koffice.c.

Select Remove and press Enter:

koffice.b

Using the DOWN arrow key scroll down to Koffice-1.6.3.i486-1. Select it by pressing the SPACEBAR. Then click OK to begin the uninstall routine:

koffice.a

The package removal begins:

koffice.f

When the package removal is finished press Enter:

koffice.e

Exit the Package Tool:

koffice.d

Click K Menu->Office and the menu shows KOffice is no longer available:

oo110

12 Installing from SlackBuild Scripts

Together we will install FUSE, the NTFS-3G driver and OpenOffice.org. Afterwards you will be able to follow the same steps to install all packages from SlackBuilds.org including Guarddog, Adobe Acrobat Reader (named acroread at SlackBuilds.org), Scribus, kmymoney2, htop, and Skype.

Open a browser window to

http://www.slackbuilds.org/. Read the HOWTO and the FAQ:

slackbuildsHowTo

Below is an excerpt from the FAQ regarding dependencies and explains why you need to read the README file for each package before installing software from SlackBuilds.org

slackbuildsHowTo.E

Installing FUSE

Click REPOSITORY to view the categories and then click System:

slackbuildsHowTo.C

The System category opens:

slackbuilds.fuse.scroll

Scroll down and click fuse:

slackbuilds.fuse

slackbuilds.fuse.page

The easiest installation method is provided by the SlackBuild HOWTO. The following is my interpretation of their instructions.

Step 1 Download the SlackBuild archive of the application

The SlackBuild archive is fuse.tar.gz. The archive contains the SlackBuild script named fuse.Slackbuild. You’ll run the SlackBuild script later. Note that the source is not included in the SlackBuild archive. The source is downloaded separately. Click the SlackBuild archive fuse.tar.gz to begin downloading:

slackbuilds10

Save it to the /Desktop/downloads directory:

slackfusedownload

When the download is finished open a terminal window in your downloads directory:

slackfusedownloadA2

Extract the contents of fuse.tar.gz by typing,

tar xzvf fuse.tar.gz

slackfusedownloadA

This creates a folder named /fuse

slackfusedownloadA1

Change to the fuse directory,

cd fuse

I refer to SlackBuild scripts a few times in this section. When I refer to any SlackBuild script I’m talking about the file that ends in .SlackBuild. In this case the SlackBuild script is named fuse.SlackBuild.

To see the SlackBuild script type ls.

slackBuild2

Step 2 Download the source of the application

Now we will download the Gzipped file containing the source code. Before downloading I’d like you to notice that the Download Source indicates that this SlackBuild is built using FUSE version 2.7.0. This is important to notice because if the source of the version you download is newer than the version linked to on this page you would need to edit the SlackBuild script as shown in step 3’s hypothetical example..

Download fuse-2.7.0.tar.gz:

slackbuilds9

Save it in the /fuse directory:

slackfusedownloadA3

Step 3 – Edit the SlackBuild script ONLY if necessary

When I installed this software I didn’t need to edit the SlackBuild script (fuse.Slackbuild) because the SlackBuild archive (fuse.tar.gz) matched version 2.7.0 of the source archive named fuse-2.7.0.tar.gz.

But, let’s assume that by the time you read this there is a newer version of FUSE. Let’s call this newer version fuse-2.8.0.tar.gz. You would then need to modify the Slackbuild script. To modify the SlackBuild script you would open fuse.Slackbuild with your favorite text editor and find the line that starts with VERSION.

Below we see the VERSION of the fuse.SlackBuild script is set to 2.7.0:

slackfusedownloadA4

But, in this hypothetical example we’re working with a newer version of FUSE named fuse-2.8.0.tar.gz.

To make this SlackBuild installation work you would change the line from VERSION=2.7.0 to VERSION=2.8.0.

slackfusedownloadA5

Then you would have saved the file and moved on:

Step 4 – Last chance to check everything:

Before building the program lets confirm the source file is in the fuse directory. Also confirm the SlackBuild script is executable. The x means executable. In the fuse directory type ls -l:

slackfusedownloadA6

The above screenshot confirms two things. First that the source file fuse-2.7.0.tar.gz is in the fuse directory.

Second, the SlackBuild script named fuse.SlackBuild is executable.

If it were not executable it would look like:

slackfusedownloadA7

And then you would have to make it executable by running the command

chmod +x fuse.SlackBuild

You could then confirm it’s executable by typing ls -l again:

slackfusedownloadA9

Step 5. Execute the SlackBuild Script (as root)

To run the SlackBuild Script su to root.

sutoroot

In the terminal, we run

./fuse.SlackBuild

The packages is created and moved to the /tmp directory:

zslackbuilds28

Step 6 – Install the Package (as root)

Change to the /tmp directory by typing,

cd /tmp

To see the name of the new package you can type ls. The completed package is named fuse-2.7.0-i486-1_SBo.tgz. You may want to save this package as a backup.

zslackbuilds29

As root type,

installpkg fuse-2.7.0-i486-1_SBo.tgz

and press Enter:

zslackbuilds30

That completes the installation of FUSE.

Installing ntfs-3g

Return to the SlackBuilds Repository and click System:

slackbuildsHowTo.C

Scroll down the page and click ntfs-3g:

slackbuilds2

The page for ntfs-3g:

na

When we click the README file we see it is dependent on FUSE 2.6.0 or later:

slackbuildsHowTo.B

Step 1 Download the SlackBuild archive of the application

Click ntfs-3g.tar.gz to download the file:

z.slackbuilds.ntfs3gB

Save the file to /Desktop/downloads/

ntgs1

Type ls and we see it’s in the downloads directory:

ntgs2

Extract ntfs-3g.tar.gz by typing,

tar xzvf ntfs-3g.tar.gz

ntgs3

Run ls and we see the new directory named ntfs-3g.

ntgs4

At the command line change your directory to the ntfs-3g directory:

cd ntfs-3g

Step 2 Download the source of the application

Click ntfs-3g-1.826.tgz to download the source of the application:

na1

At the command line change your directory to the ntfs-3g directory:

cd ntfs-3g

Unfortunately, we get a 404 error:

nb

So, go back to the Slackbuild page for ntfs-3g.

Click the home page for the NTFS-3G Driver:

z.slackbuilds.ntfs3gAa

On the home page for the NTFS-3G Read/Write Driver we see that there is a new version of ntfs-3g, version 1.913:

slackBuilds.fuse.ntfs3

Download the latest release to your ntfs-3g directory:

ntgs5

Step 3 – Edit the SlackBuild script ONLY if necessary

In this case it is required to edit the SlackBuild script because we are using a newer version of the program.

Open ntfs-3g.SlackBuild with your favorite text editor. Find the line that starts with VERSION. Below we see the VERSION of the ntfs-3g.SlackBuild script is set to 1.826:

nb1

Since the the new version is ntfs-3g-1.913.tgz we edit the line to read VERSION=1.913

ntgs8

That’s all you need to do. Save the file, exit and continue.

Step 4 – Last chance to check everything:

Before building the program lets confirm the source file is here and that the SlackBuild script is executable.

Type,

ls -l

ntgs10

The above screenshot confirms two things. First that the source file ntfs-3g-1.913.tgz is in the ntfs-3g directory.

Second, the SlackBuild script named ntfs-3g.SlackBuild is executable.

Step 5. Execute the SlackBuild Script (as root)

In the command line window, type

su

to become root.

As root run the SlackBuild script:

./ntfs-3g.SlackBuild

The package creation is completed and the file is put in /tmp:

ntgs11

Step 6 – Install the Package (as root)

In the command line window, type

cd /tmp

To install type

installpkg ntfs-3g-1.913-i486-1_SBo.tgz

ntfs7

And that completes the installation of the NTFS driver. You may want to save the ntfs-3g-1.913-i486-1_SBo.tgz package so you can install on another machine or have for backup. In Section 22 you can read how I use the NTFS driver.

Installing OpenOffice.org

Click Office from the REPOSITORY page:

slackbuildsHowTo.C

The Office category:

ooz

Scroll down the page and click openoffice.org:

ooa1

Step 1 Download the SlackBuild archive of the application

Click openoffice.org.tar.gz to start the download of the SlackBuild archive:

oo2a

Save it to /Desktop/downloads:

ooa4

In the command window extract the contents by typing,

tar -xzvf openoffice.org.tar.gz.

zo3oa

This creates a new directory named /openoffice.org.

In the terminal window, type

cd openoffice.org

Step 2: Download the source of the application

Download the source and save it to the openoffice.org directory:

oo7

oo8

Step 3 – Edit the SlackBuild script ONLY if necessary

Below is part of the SlackBuild script where you can see that the version of the script is the same as the version of the application. This requires no editing:

oo9aa

Step 4 – Last chance to check everything:

Before building the program lets confirm the source file is here and that the SlackBuild script is executable.

In terminal type,

ls -l

zooa3

Above we see the source file named OOo_2.2.1_LinuxIntel_install_en-US.tar.gz is in the openoffice.org directory. And the color green happens to represent executable files in this screen.

Step 5. Execute the SlackBuild Script (as root)

To run the SlackBuild Script su to root:

sutoroot

In the terminal type,

./openoffice.org.SlackBuild

The packages is created and then moved to the /tmp directory:

oo11

Step 6 – Install the Package (as root)

Go to the /tmp directory by typing,

cd /tmp

zooa5

In the terminal type,

su

to become root.

To see the name of the file you can type ls. At this point the completed packages is named openoffice.org-2.2.1_en_US-i586-2_SBo.tgz.

zooa4

To install type,

installpkg openoffice.org-2.2.1_en_US-i586-2_SBo.tgz

oo13

oo14

And that completes the installation of OpenOffice.org.

To see the new programs in the menu click K-Menu->Office:

oo15

Now you can follow the above method to install any SlackBuild package including:
– Guarddog
– Adobe Acrobat reader (named acroread at SlackBuilds.org)
– Scribus
– kmymoney2
– htop
– Skype

13 Inventory (IV)

In the inventory list below I made the assumption that you installed the other applications from section 12 and checked them off with an [x]. Our inventory should now look like this:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[ ] Google Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Java Runtime Environment
[x] Flash
[x] RealPlayer
[x] aKregator
[x] Pidgin
[x] Xchat IRC
[x] gFTP
[x] BitTorrent
[x] Guarddog
[ ] Google Earth
[x] Skype

Office:
[x] OpenOffice.org
[x] Adobe Acrobat reader
[x] Kontact
[x] Scribus
[x] kmymoney2

Sound & Video:
[x] Audacious
[x] K3B
[x] Noatun
[ ] VLC Media Player

Programming:
[x] Quanta Plus
[x] Kate
[x] The Java 2 SDK

System Utilities:
[x] htop
[x] iptraf
[x] netstat
[ ] Filelight
[x] KDE Info Center
[x] Konqueror

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[x] NTFS-3G driver
[x] FUSE

 

14. Installing .bin files

Together we will install Google Picasa and Google Earth.

Install Google Picasa

Open your browser window to http://picasa.google.com/linux/. Click Download Picasa for Linux:

google5

Then click:

google6

Save the file:

picasasave1

In this example I created a directory named googlePicasa in my /downloads directory to save the file to:

picasasave2

You don’t need to be root to run this installer.

In the terminal we run,

sh picasa-2.2.2820-5.i386.bin

Select your Options and then click Begin Install:

google8

To start Picasa click Start:

picasasave3

Click I Agree:

picasasave4

Select a scanning option and click Continue:

picasasave5

Picasa opens:

picasasave7

To start Picasa at any time click the K Menu->Graphics->Picasa

picasasave6

Install Google Earth

Get the software at http://earth.google.com/download-earth.html

Click Agree and Download:

gearth1

Save the file to your downloads directory:

gearth2

You don’t need to be root to install Google Earth.

To install type,

sh GoogleEarthLinux.bin

gearth5

Google Earth’s default settings are OK, so click on Begin Install:

gearth3

After the Google Earth installation, you can either select to start it immediately or to quit. I select Quit here (although it doesn’t matter what you select):

gearth4

Google Earth is at K Menu->Internet>Google Earth

na2

In Google Earth you can view the Universe as well as the Earth. Click View->Switch to Sky:

gemenu2

15 Inventory (V)

Our inventory should now look like this:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] Google Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Java Runtime Environment
[x] Flash
[x] RealPlayer
[x] aKregator
[x] Pidgin
[x] Xchat IRC
[x] gFTP
[x] BitTorrent
[x] Guarddog
[x] Google Earth
[x] Skype

Office:
[x] OpenOffice.org
[x] Adobe Acrobat reader
[x] Kontact
[x] Scribus
[x] kmymoney2

Sound & Video:
[x] Audacious
[x] K3B
[x] Noatun
[ ] VLC Media Player

Programming:
[x] Quanta Plus
[x] Kate
[x] The Java 2 SDK

System Utilities:
[x] htop
[x] iptraf
[x] netstat
[ ] Filelight
[x] KDE Info Center
[x] Konqueror

Other:
[] VMware Server
[x] NTFS-3G driver
[x] FUSE

16. From installpkg:

Install VLC Media Player

Go to the VLC media player for Linux Slackware.

Download from a location close to you.

 

vlc2

Click OK to save the file:

vlcInstallA

I saved it to /downloads/vlc:

vlcInstallA1

At the command line change your directory to /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/vlc by typing

cd /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/vlc

At the terminal window type

ls

vlcInstallA3

Type,

su

to become root:

sutoroot

To install type,

installpkg vlc-0.8.5-i686-3.tgz

vlcInstallA4

This finishes the installation of VLC.

But, when you Click K Menu->Multimedia VLC isn’t there:

vlcInstallA7

To simplify running VLC we’re going to add it to the K Menu using the Menu Editor.

Right click K Menu and then click Menu Editor:

vlceditmenu

The KDE Menu Editor opens. We’re going to add VLC to the Multimedia section.

Highlight Multimedia:

vlcInstallA8

And click File->New Item:

vlcInstallA9

Name it VLC and click OK:

vlcInstallA10

 

The VLC entry appears as follows:

vlceditmenu1

Now add the path to start VLC in the field labeled Command. That means we need to know the path to the VLC executable file. The which command will find it. At the command line window locate the path to the VLC executable by typing,

which vlc

That shows us the path to start VLC is/usr/bin/vlc.

Type /usr/bin/vlc in the Command field:

vlcInstallA11

Now we have everything we need if we want VLC to appear in the K Menu under the Multimedia tab:

vlcInMenucmd

Click the Save icon below:

vlcclv

The Menu Editor updates:

vlcInstallA18

Click File-Quit.

To start VLC click K-Menu->Multimedia->VLC:

vlcInstallA19

Below is a QuickTime movie being played in VLC. It’s another student film I made and you can watch it here.

vlclisa

17. Inventory (VI)

Our inventory should now look like this:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] Google Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Java Runtime Environment
[x] Flash
[x] RealPlayer
[x] aKregator
[x] Pidgin
[x] Xchat IRC
[x] gFTP
[x] BitTorrent
[x] Guarddog
[x] Google Earth
[x] Skype

Office:
[x] OpenOffice.org
[x] Adobe Acrobat reader
[x] Kontact
[x] Scribus
[x] kmymoney2

Sound & Video:
[x] Audacious
[x] K3B
[x] Noatun
[x] VLC Media Player

Programming:
[x] Quanta Plus
[x] Kate
[x] The Java 2 SDK

System Utilities:
[x] htop
[x] iptraf
[x] netstat
[ ] Filelight
[x] KDE Info Center
[x] Konqueror

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[x] NTFS-3G driver
[x] FUSE

18. Install VMware Server From a Perl script:

With VMware Server you can run other Operating Systems on your desktop. This can be useful if you depend on some applications that exist for Windows only, or if you want to switch to Linux slowly.

To download VMware Server, go to http://www.vmware.com/download/server/ and click on Download Now:

vmwwarein

Accept the license agreement by clicking Yes:

vmwareagree

Then download the VMware Server for Linux .tar.gz file (not the rpm file!) to your desktop (e.g. to /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/vmware/):

vmwaredl

To run VMware Server you need to get the serial number. Go to http://register.vmware.com/content/registration.html. Fill in your personal details. Afterwards you will get a page with a serial number for VMware Server. Write it down or print it out:

vmwareinstallA

Just for your information older versions of VMware Server required the vmware-any-any-update patch. When I installed VMware Server’s latest version (1.0.4 | 9/18/07 | Build 56528) for this tutorial, I did not need the patch. Just in case you need the patch I wrote a brief HOWTO to install VMware using the any-any patch in Section 22.

To install VMware Server, open a terminal and type,

su

to become root.

sutoroot

Change your directory to the one containing VMware-server-1.0.4-56528.tar.gz, e.g. /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/vmware (replace brian with your own username!):

cd /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/vmware/

VMware will NOT install unless we first create a directory in /etc.

In the command line window type,

mkdir /etc/pam.d

Unpack the VMware-server-1.0.4-56528.tar.gz file and run the installer:

tar xzvf VMware-server-1.0.4-56528.tar.gz

Then,

cd vmware-server-distrib/

To install type,

./vmware-install.pl

The installer will ask you a lot of questions. You can always accept the default values simply by hitting Enter. When you see this question:

In which directory do you want to keep your virtual machine files?

[/var/lib/vmware/Virtual Machines]

you can either accept the default value or specify a location that has enough free space to store your virtual machines.

Press Enter:

V16

Press Enter:

V17

Press Enter:

V18

At the end of the installation, you will be asked to enter a serial number:

Please enter your 20-character serial number.

Type XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX or ‘Enter’ to cancel:

Fill in your serial number for VMware Server.

To start VMware click K Menu->System->VMware Server Console:

Select Local host and click Connect:

V19

I’m lucky enough to still have my copy of MS-DOS 6.22 on four floppy disks and my copy of One Must Fall: 2097

omf

Enjoy VMware!

 

19 Inventory (VII)

Our inventory should now look like this:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] Google Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Java Runtime Environment
[x] Flash
[x] RealPlayer
[x] aKregator
[x] Pidgin
[x] Xchat IRC
[x] gFTP
[x] BitTorrent
[x] Guarddog
[x] Google Earth
[x] Skype

Office:
[x] OpenOffice.org
[x] Adobe Acrobat reader
[x] Kontact
[x] Scribus
[x] kmymoney2

Sound & Video:
[x] Audacious
[x] K3B
[x] Noatun
[x] VLC Media Player

Programming:
[x] Quanta Plus
[x] Kate
[x] The Java 2 SDK

System Utilities:
[x] htop
[x] iptraf
[x] netstat
[ ] Filelight
[x] KDE Info Center
[x] Konqueror

Other:
[x] VMware Server
[x] NTFS-3G driver
[x] FUSE

20 Installing From Source:

Installing from source code is easy. Usually the following steps are all you need to do:

./configure

make

su -c “make install”

Download Filelight from http://www.methylblue.com/filelight/.

Notice that this is a Bzipped file unlike all the other downloads in this tutorial that are Gzipped. This means that we’ll be extracting the file using tar xjvf instead of tar xzvf.

Click the Source tarball to download:

Filelight

Save the file:

Filelight1

I made a directory named filelight and saved it there:

Filelight2

In the terminal window type,

cd /home/brian/Desktop/downloads/filelight

Then extract the contents by typing,

tar xjvf filelight-1.0.tar.bz2

After you unpack the file a directory is created named filelight-1.0.

Change your directory to filelight-1.0 by typing,

cd filelight-1.0

Type,

./configure

Then run make,

make

Finally run,

su -c “make install”

Or, if you are already logged in as root just type,

make install

Once installation is finished run the program by clicking, K Menu->Utilities->Filelight:

Filelight3

 

Filelight4

21 Inventory (VIII)

We now have all wanted applications installed.

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] Google Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Java Runtime Environment
[x] Flash
[x] RealPlayer
[x] aKregator
[x] Pidgin
[x] Xchat IRC
[x] gFTP
[x] BitTorrent
[x] Guarddog
[x] Google Earth
[x] Skype

Office:
[x] OpenOffice.org
[x] Adobe Acrobat reader
[x] Kontact
[x] Scribus
[x] kmymoney2

Sound & Video:
[x] Audacious
[x] K3B
[x] Noatun
[x] VLC Media Player

Programming:
[x] Quanta Plus
[x] Kate
[x] The Java 2 SDK

System Utilities:
[x] htop
[x] iptraf
[x] netstat
[x] Filelight
[x] KDE Info Center
[x] Konqueror

Other:
[x] VMware Server
[x] NTFS-3G driver
[x] FUSE

22 Extra Information:

Learning about man

If you would like to learn more about any commands you can use the man program.

To learn about the command man simply type,

man man

and press enter:

x7

The manual page for man opens. Press q to quit:

x8

To learn about the command su type,

man su

x6

The manual page for su opens. Press q to quit:

x5

Clicks and KDE

If you’re coming from a double-click Windows type environment you may be wondering why everything is opening when you single click a file or folder. The default for KDE is a single mouse click. To change this setting click, K-Menu->Settings->Peripherals->Mouse

kdedefaults

Select Double-click to open files and folders:

kdedefaults1

Firefox warnings

This is how I deal with a minor Firefox annoyance. Firefox’s default settings mean getting warned about almost every website you open or close. To stop these warnings you can do the following. In Firefox click Edit->Preferences. Then click the tab named Security. In the section named Warning Messages click Settings. Uncheck the warnings you don’t want to be notified about.

firefoxwarnings

NTFS-3G

You can mount NTFS partitions by adding them to your fstab file or manually from the command line. I manually edited my fstab file to mount my NTFS partitions at every boot. I’d like to show you how I modified my fstab file to allow me to read and write to my NTFS partitions.

The file named fstab is the configuration file containing information about your partitions. fstab is located in /etc.

Change your directory to /etc:

cd /etc

In the terminal type,

su

to become root.

sutoroot

Backup of your fstab file before editing it,

cp fstab fstab.BAK

Below is my fstab file before modifications (click here to learn why the line for the /dev/cdrom is commented out). From the fstab file you can see I have one SATA drive with three partitions; swap, / and /home.

fstaba2

Below is the screenshot after I modified it to mount my NTFS partitions.

fstaba3

Let’s take a closer look at the line for the NTFS partition with the mount point /mydocs:

fstabTip

The first field is the device. Most devices are indicated by a file name (of a block special device), like /dev/sda1. In this example, /dev/sdb1 is the second hard drive on my PC.

The second field indicates the mount point for the filesystem. The mount point is an existing directory on your disk. In this example it’s the /mydocs directory.

The third field lists the filesystem type. In this case the NTFS partition is indicated by the ntfs-3g driver.

The fourth field are the mount options. To mount the file system read-write we use rw. To allow every user to mount and unmount the file system we use users. To let my user account access my NTFS partitions I use umask=1000. This makes the user with uid 1000 to be the owner of all files. And my account uid is 1000. To find your uid run the program id,

id brian

ntgs13

The fifth field is used for these filesystems by the dump command to determine which filesystems need to be dumped. If the fifth field is not present, a value of zero is returned and dump will assume that the filesystem does not need to be dumped.

The sixth field is used by the fsck program to determine the order in which filesystem checks are done at reboot time.

The other option is to manually mount your NTFS partitions. You can mount any NTFS volume in read-write mode with the command,

mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /media/windows

Of course, your device name and mount point may be different.

How do I use the command line version of BitTorrent that I installed in Section 9?

We’ll need to download a torrent to test the program. Once we confirm it works we’ll quit BitTorrent right away. Using Firefox open your browser window to http://www.slackware.com/getslack/torrents.php.

Select one of the Torrents for 12 to download:

bittorrentDownloadCurses2

Select Open with /usr/bin/bittorrent-xter (default) and click OK:

bitInstall2

Because BitTorrent integrates with Firefox the download begins immediately. Press q to quit and close the BitTorrent window.

bitInstall3

Now lets test from the command line. Download the torrent again but this time click Save to Disk:

bittorrentDownloadCurses3

Open a terminal where you saved the torrent and type,

bittorrent-curses slackware-12.0-install-dvd.torrent

bittorrentDownloadCurses4

BitTorrent starts downloading the file. When starting from the command line BitTorrent looks like:

bittorrentDownloadCurses

Again, press q to stop the download.

Have fun with BitTorrent!

Using the any-any-update to install VMware Server

Before applying the patch follow the instructions from Section 18 of this tutorial to install VMware Server. The VMware Server installer needs to run and then fail prior to using the patch. At some point the installation will return an error that may look like:

vmfail

After VMware Server returns the error you’re ready to install the patch. First, read about the patch here.

You can get the patch here

Download, vmware-any-any-update113.tar.gz

In the terminal type in,

su

to become root.

Extract the file by typing,

tar xzvf vmware-any-any-update113.tar.gz

A new directory is created. Change you directory to the new directory by typing,

cd vmware-any-any-update113

Run the patch by typing,

./runme.pl

The installer will ask you a lot of questions. You can always accept the default values simply by hitting Enter.

After the patch runs the module should load in the kernel:

vmwaremodok

And the installation should complete:

vmwareOK

To start VMware click K Menu->System->VMware Server Console

Slackware: http://www.slackware.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

comments